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SLAY THE DRAGON follows everyday people, outraged by what they see as an attack on the core democratic principle that every person’s vote should count equally. This election year, we’re joining together with grassroots partners to put an end to gerrymandering. Because this issue impacts each state differently, we’ve created a map to help you navigate how gerrymandering affects your state and community. SLAY THE DRAGON arrives on demand April 3.

 

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Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

Slay the Dragon Logo

SLAY THE DRAGON follows everyday people, outraged by what they see as an attack on the core democratic principle that every person’s vote should count equally. This election year, we’re joining together with grassroots partners to put an end to gerrymandering. Because this issue impacts each state differently, we’ve created a map to help you navigate how gerrymandering affects your state and community. SLAY THE DRAGON arrives on demand April 3.

 

GET CAUGHT UP
Oregon

Process

Oregon's state legislative and congressional district lines are drawn by the Legislature by ordinary statute, and are subject to the Governor's veto. The Legislature can override vetoes with a two-thirds vote in each chamber.

In addition to the federal requirements of one person, one vote and the Voting Rights Act, Oregon law requires that state legislative and congressional districts be contiguous, preserve political subdivisions, and preserve communities of interest. Intentionally favoring an incumbent, party, or candidate for office is prohibited.

Issues

Oregon has a ballot initiative process, and a ballot initiative was filed in November 2019 to create an independent citizen commission. There are three versions: one that handles both state legislative and congressional districting, one for only state legislative lines, and one for only congressional lines. If both the state legislative specific and congressional specific initiatives pass, the two commissions would merge into one. The initiative is being pushed by a coalition led by People Not Politicians. Unlike the other initiatives filed in 2020, the Oregon initiative 57 seems to be unfazed by the current public health crisis, relying on supporters to print, fill out, and mail their signatures.

  • These initiatives would create a 12-member independent citizen commission, chosen from the applicant pool by a diverse and qualified panel of three administrative law judges. Two of these judges would be registered with the two largest parties in the state and one would not be registered with either. If there are more than 900 eligible applications to be on the commission, 300 applicants per partisan category (largest party, second-largest, and unaffiliated) would be randomly selected. If any category has fewer than 300 applicants, no random selection occurs. From these pools, the judge panel would select 150 applicants (50 per partisan category) who are qualified and reflective of the state's diversity. From these applicants, the secretary of state would choose two applicants per partisan category. These six randomly-chosen commissioners would then choose six more (two per partisan category) by a vote of four out of six, including one vote per partisan category.

  • Once selected, the commission would choose a chair and vice-chair by a simple majority vote, and these positions must be held by commissioners of different partisan categories. Any official action would require seven votes, and final approval of maps would require seven votes, with at least one vote per partisan category. Approved maps would be accompanied by a report detailing the commission's rationale, how it responded to public input, and how it complied with criteria. If the commission fails to approve a map, any group of four commissioners that includes one per partisan category may submit a plan to the state Supreme Court. If maps go to the Supreme Court, it would review them and communicate its judgment to the commission as necessary. It would also need to follow criteria and would be allowed to appoint a Special Master.

  • Before holding any meeting or public hearing, the commission would have to provide at least 14 days' notice with exceptions made for notice later in a cycle or following a court order. The commission would hold at least ten public hearings prior to a map being drafted and five after drafting but before approval, including at least one hearing per congressional district, one hearing per state region, and one hearing at each stage in areas with the largest population shifts. All records and data would be public record and would have to be posted to "ensure immediate and widespread public access."

  • The initiative would enshrine criteria that would guide the commission's line-drawing. First, it would require compliance with state and federal law, population equality, and contiguity. Next, it would require the minimization of splitting localities and communities of interest with a definition of what counts as a COI. It would also require maximizing competitiveness, which it defines as the ability to translate support into representation. The commission would adopt a measure of competitiveness to be used for this purpose. The initiative also would prohibit the consideration of incumbent or candidate addresses; the favoring/disfavoring of an incumbent, candidate, or party; and the dilution of the voting strength of language and ethnic minorities.

In 2020, the entire Oregon House and half of the Oregon Senate will be up for re-election.

Based upon a recent estimate of congressional seat changes following the 2020 census, Oregon is estimated to gain one congressional seat.

Actions

Support the ballot initiative to establish an independent redistricting process.

  • The initiative recently completed the initial signature gathering and public comment requirements.

  • To get on the ballot in November, the initiative must receive 149,360 valid signatures by July 2, 2020.

In 2020, support candidates who will advocate for fair districting.

In 2021, use public input to push Legislature towards drawing fair districts and to identify communities.

  • Obtain Oregon redistricting data from OpenPrecincts.

  • Use software tools such as Dave's Redistricting App and Districtr to draw district maps showing either (a) what a fair map would look like, or (b) where the community you believe should be better represented is located.

Contacts

Princeton Gerrymandering Project Data provided by the Princeton Gerrymandering Project

State Info

Congressional Boundaries: Drawn by legislature
State Boundaries: Drawn by legislature
Legislative Control: Democratic
Governor's Political Party: Democratic
Last Updated: May 26 2020