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SLAY THE DRAGON follows everyday people, outraged by what they see as an attack on the core democratic principle that every person’s vote should count equally. This election year, we’re joining together with grassroots partners to put an end to gerrymandering. Because this issue impacts each state differently, we’ve created a map to help you navigate how gerrymandering affects your state and community. SLAY THE DRAGON arrives on demand April 3.

 

GET CAUGHT UP

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

us map

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

Slay the Dragon Logo

SLAY THE DRAGON follows everyday people, outraged by what they see as an attack on the core democratic principle that every person’s vote should count equally. This election year, we’re joining together with grassroots partners to put an end to gerrymandering. Because this issue impacts each state differently, we’ve created a map to help you navigate how gerrymandering affects your state and community. SLAY THE DRAGON arrives on demand April 3.

 

GET CAUGHT UP

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

us map

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

Oklahoma

Process

Oklahoma's state legislative and congressional district lines are drawn by the state legislature by ordinary statute, and are subject to the governor's veto. The legislature can override vetoes with a two-thirds vote in each chamber.

In addition to the federal requirements of one person, one vote and the Voting Rights Act, Oklahoma law requires that state legislative and congressional districts be compact, contiguous, preserve political subdivisions, and preserve communities of interest.

Issues

Because of the substantial Native American population, Oklahoma has special challenges in making certain that they are represented.

Oklahoma has a ballot initiative process. An initiative was filed with the Secretary of State that would create an independent redistricting commission. However, this first initiative was struck by a court because its "gist," or short explanation, did not properly notify what the initiative was about. Since that ruling, People Not Politicians has refiled its initiative, now State Question 810, to correct this, and the new gist was recently upheld by the state Supreme Court. At the moment, signature gathering has been placed on hold by the Secretary of State during the pandemic. As such, it seems unlikely for this initiative to make the ballot before the 2021 cycle.

  • State Question 810 would create a nine-member independent citizen commission with three commissioners from the largest party, three from the second largest, and three unaffiliated with either. To begin, the Chief Justice of the state Supreme Court would appoint the director or an employee of its Administrative Office to oversee the application process and serve as Special Master. The Chief Justice would also appoint a panel of three retired judges, who would be chosen through random selection. The panel would choose three pools of 20 applicants for each partisan category who the panel believes to be most qualified to serve on the commission. Each pool would need to have at least three applicants from each congressional district, and the pools would need to reflect the state's diversity. From these pools of 20, three applicants per partisan category would be randomly chosen to serve as commissioners, and one per category would be chosen to serve as an alternate.

  • Once chosen, the commission would vote on choosing a secretary, whose duties would include scheduling public hearings, preparing precinct-level shapefiles for public download, and maintaining the commission's website. This website would allow the public to submit comments, access the data and tools needed to draw plans, view prior district plans, and submit draft plans and maps of communities of interest. In addition, the commission would post census, electoral, and boundary data "in digitally readable format at district and precinct levels" for its two draft plans per district type and release all maps in a publicly accessible and readable way.

  • The commission would have to provide at least 48-hours' notice before any hearing or meeting, and all meetings would be live-streamed with their transcripts electronically archived. Before drafting a plan, the commission would be required to hold at least one public hearing per congressional district. After the hearings, the commission would develop and release the plan publicly in digitally accessible maps and census block-equivalency files, and it would have to accept public comment for at least 14 days. Any vote would have to take place in a public voting meeting, and map approval would require six votes, including one per partisan category. If a map fails to be approved, the appointed Special Master would submit a report and all draft plans to the state Supreme Court, who would approve a plan within 30 days.

  • The initiative also would enshrine redistricting criteria, beginning with compliance with federal law and contiguity. After these, the remaining criteria are listed in order of priority: (1) minimizing the splitting of communities of interest defined as an area with similar interests but not including partisanship; (2) prohibiting districts that deny or abridge the voting rights of racial and ethnic minorities; (3) ensuring partisan fairness on a statewide level as determined by "the best available statistical methods on identifying inequality of opportunity to elect;" (4) respecting the geographic integrity of political subdivisions; and (5) being compact. Additionally, the commission cannot take incumbent or candidate address into account nor the party affiliation or voting history of the population of a district.

The entire Oklahoma House and half of the Oklahoma Senate will be up for re-election in 2020.

Actions

Support State Question 810 to establish an independent redistricting commission in Oklahoma.

  • After being cleared for circulation, supporters will have 90 days to collect 177,958 signatures for the initiative to be on the 2020 ballot.

  • Attend a town hall event about the initiative.

In 2020, support legislative candidates who will advocate for fair districting.

In 2021, use public input to push the Legislature towards drawing fair districts.

  • Obtain Oklahoma redistricting data from OpenPrecincts.

  • Use software tools such as Dave's Redistricting App and Districtr to draw district maps showing either (a) what a fair map would look like, or (b) where the community you believe should be better represented is located.

Contacts

Princeton Gerrymandering Project Data provided by the Princeton Gerrymandering Project

State Info

Congressional Boundaries: Drawn by legislature
State Boundaries: Drawn by legislature
Legislative Control: Republican
Governor's Political Party: Republican
Last Updated: Jun 18 2020