Slay the Dragon Logo

SLAY THE DRAGON follows everyday people, outraged by what they see as an attack on the core democratic principle that every person’s vote should count equally. This election year, we’re joining together with grassroots partners to put an end to gerrymandering. Because this issue impacts each state differently, we’ve created a map to help you navigate how gerrymandering affects your state and community. SLAY THE DRAGON arrives on demand April 3.

 

GET CAUGHT UP

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

us map

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

Slay the Dragon Logo

SLAY THE DRAGON follows everyday people, outraged by what they see as an attack on the core democratic principle that every person’s vote should count equally. This election year, we’re joining together with grassroots partners to put an end to gerrymandering. Because this issue impacts each state differently, we’ve created a map to help you navigate how gerrymandering affects your state and community. SLAY THE DRAGON arrives on demand April 3.

 

GET CAUGHT UP

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

us map

Click on your state in the map above to find out what’s going on and how you can help.

We are partnering with organizations in Michigan, Colorado, Wisconsin to support the creation of non-partisan redistricting commissions to protect votes across the country.

Colorado

Process

Independent Redistricting Commissions

Beginning in the 2020 redistricting cycle, Colorado's state legislative and congressional districts will be drawn by two separate independent redistricting commissions. These commissions were created after Colorado voters approved Amendments Y and Z by wide margins in the 2018 elections. Both commissions will consist of 12 members: four registered with the state’s largest political party, four with the second largest, and four with no political party. Approving a map requires a supermajority of eight commission members, including two who are unaffiliated.

The two commissions have nearly identical selection processes (congressional outlined in Art. V, § 44.1, state legislative outlined in Art. V, § 47), though the deadlines differ. In summary, applications for both commissions are due by November 10, 2020. A panel of three retired state judges screens the applications and randomly selects 300 applicants from both major parties and 450 unaffiliated applicants, then narrows down to the 50 most qualified in each category; separately, legislative leaders of both parties each submit a list of ten applicants from the original pool who affiliate with one of the two major parties. The panel of judges ultimately selects the 12 members of each commission from the panel’s pools and the legislative leaders’ pools.

Criteria

In addition to the federal requirements of one person, one vote and the Voting Rights Act, Colorado’s state constitution requires that state legislative (Art. V, § 48.1) and congressional (Art. V, § 44.3) districts be compact, contiguous, preserve political subdivisions, preserve communities of interest (defined in detail in Art. V, § 46(3)), and be drawn to promote competitiveness. Additionally, intentionally favoring or disfavoring an incumbent, party, or candidate for office is prohibited.

Public Input

Per the Colorado Constitution (Art. V, § 44.2(3) for congressional; Art. V, § 48(3) for state legislative), “all Colorado residents… may present proposed redistricting maps or written comments, or both, for the commission’s consideration.” Both commissions must also conduct at least three public hearings in each congressional district and accept public comment through their websites. 

Issues

Congressional Seats

Based upon a recent estimate of congressional seat changes following the 2020 census, Colorado is poised to gain one congressional seat.

Census Delays

  • State legislative redistricting plans deadline: September 15, 2021; but constitution allows delay for “conditions outside the commission’s control” (Art. V, § 48.2)
    • Preliminary plans deadline: 30-45 days after census data
    • Public hearings deadline: July 21, 2021
  • Congressional redistricting plans deadline: September 1, 2021; but constitution allows delay for “conditions outside the commission’s control” (Art. V, § 44.4)
    • Preliminary plans deadline: 30-45 days after census data
    • Public hearings deadline: July 7, 2021

The Census Bureau may delay sending population data to states until as late as July 31, 2021. In the case of delay, Colorado’s current timeline would be impossible, if not for the safety valve provision. With this provision, and Colorado’s late candidate filing deadline, the commission should be able to shift dates to complete redistricting on time.

History

There were a number of issues throughout the 2011 redistricting cycle, from data delays to partisan fighting to contentious public input, culminating in lawsuits from both major political parties over the redistricting plans that reached the state Supreme Court. This cycle, the entirely new redistricting process under the two independent redistricting commissions will hopefully prevent these issues from reoccurring.

Actions

Apply to be a citizen commissioner on the commissions’ website.

Participate in the Commission’s public input process.

  • Obtain Colorado redistricting data from OpenPrecincts.
  • Start to plan out what defines your community – whether it’s a shared economic interest, school districts, or other social or other cultural, historical, or economic interests – and how that can be represented on a map. This will come in handy once the commissions start collecting feedback.
  • Use software tools such as Dave's Redistricting App and Districtr to draw district maps showing either (a) what a fair map would look like, or (b) where the community you believe should be better represented is located.

Contacts

Princeton Gerrymandering Project Data provided by the Princeton Gerrymandering Project

State Info

Congressional Boundaries: Drawn by independent redistricting commission
State Boundaries: Drawn by independent redistricting commission
Legislative Control: Democratic
Governor's Political Party: Democratic
Last Updated: Oct 13 2020